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The Chatelaine w(h)ines and dines with peeps ... and naturally fallen angels.

Monday, December 26, 2005

THE WAY CHRISTMAS SHOULD BE COOKED

So, based on prior two posts, my strengths clearly are not in moi cooking. Here, by comparison, is the Christmas dinner menu (for six) with Chef-Poet Sandy McIntosh reporting:

SANDY & BARBARA MCINTOSH'S XMAS MENU:

Homemade Gravlax Cured in Aquavit

Popovers

Evening Garlic Soup in the Manner of the Correze

Chicken with Salsify Tarts

Roasted Beets and Onion Salad with Orange Slices in Hazelnut Dressing

Potatoes with Guyere and Bacon

Glazed Ham ala Paul Prudomme

Trifle

Sandy adds, "The surprise of this dinner was the wine, brought by one of the guests who is proud of his ability (cheap bastard) to buy good wines for little money. We began with an Australian sparkling wine from Lorikeet, which was fruity without acidity and had the feel of an expensive champagne, with nothing unpleasant left on the tongue. (I think it cost him about $4.00.) Throughout the meal we enjoyed a California blended Chardonnay from Barefoot. This won a 98 point double gold rating at the 2002 California State Fair. (Amazing at, believe it or not, a case price of $2.50 per bottle.) We ended with another Lorikeet sparkling wine, this time a Shiraz. Odd to drink a red sparkling wine, but it was quite good. None of these wines seem to be on anyone's radar, so I'm glad to have tasted them."

*****

But, Sandy, WHAT THE HOO-HAA IS "IN THE MANNER OF THE CORREZE"?!

1 Comments:

  • At 8:10 AM, Blogger EILEEN said…

    Sandy McIntosh replies:

    "The Correze is a canton of Limosin, a province of central France in the northwestern part of the Massif Central. (http://www.discoverfrance.net/France/Provinces/Limousin.shtml) The "manner of the Correze" I think refers to the way the soup is finished: eggs separated, beaten, and the yolks beaten again with vinegar. Some of the soup is added to the yolks to temper them, then both yolks and egg whites are added to the soup in thin strings.

    "BTW this recipe, as well as the recipe for the Chicken and Salisfy tart comes from Paula Wolfert, a believer in the "slow cooking" methods. The tart dish has 17 separate operations performed over two-three days. So, this meal is not one I want to make more than twice in a year.

    "Meanwhile, we'll break out the Mallomars."

     

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